Monday, November 9, 2009

Framing Quilts

I finished framing these three 10x10" quilts and I'm really happy with how they turned out. Because these pieces were completed earlier, my best option for framing them was to simply adhere them to the surface of a framed canvas.

But I didn't want to put them on plain white canvas, so I painted the canvas first with metallic acrylic paint. Mostly I wanted the edges painted, but I covered inside the edge on both the front and rear, so no white canvas would show. After the paint dried, I glued on a piece of heavy butcher paper to seal the back of the frame. In the photo above, the butcher paper has been applied to the painted canvas.

When that was fully dry, I took an X-Acto knife right along the edge to trim off the excess paper. Added a screw eye and picture wire.

These little quilts had already been finished with fabric hanging corners, so I removed those before gluing them on the frames. With Elmer's glue, I adhered the quilt to the frame, covered it with white paper, and laid a dictionary on top for an hour or two. This gluing method I learned from Jeanne Williamson, who had the chutzpah to actually glue a quilt to a frame. Thanks, Jeanne. It worked beautifully! I have two small pieces hanging in my home that I want to frame now.

The fabric-corners-and-dowel method, which I learned from Beth Wheeler, has worked thus far with these small quilts, and is definitely a good option for hanging quilts around my studio. But as my thinking about Quilts as Art is evolving, I'm quite sure framing is a better option for small(er) work -- which to me means 16x20" or under. Incidentally, Dick Blick is having a terrific sale on frames til the end of the year. I just ordered a truck load!

12 comments:

Vicki W said...

They look great!

Gerrie said...

This is great. I ususally use gel medium, but Elmer's is sure cheaper! And I have a ton of it.

The Green Stone Woman said...

What a neat job you did on that! It looks really good. Of course, the quilts are fabulous, but the framing is done very well. How very daring to try this out.

frazzledsugarplummum said...

They look Fab.

margaret said...

The paper on the back really finishes off the job - very professional!

pattynubs said...

Thanks for the post. I have to mount some pieces and now I know how! FYI before gluing on the back paper, mist the paper very lightly with water. The water will cause the paper to shrink as it drys so you get a nice tight back. Also, take a fine sanding block at a 45 degree angle (with the back facing up) and very lightly sand the edges to cut off the paper sanding in the same direction from back to front. I learned both of these tips when I use to go to a frame it yourself shop.

Alice said...

Connie, this is brilliant. I've been on a constant search for better ways to present textiles, and this looks like the best one yet. I look forward to trying it out. Thanks!

Connie Rose said...

Thanks for all your comments, and the great suggestions, Patty!

Gina said...

Beautiful quilts! And thanks for sharing the glue idea. I have been stitching my small quilts to frames. I won't be so afraid of glue now.

The Idaho Beauty said...

In all the articles and blog posts about attaching art quilts to stretched canvas, this is the first one to address the back. I've seen this demonstrated on artwork you would put inside a regular frame - in never occurred to me to do it on this sort of mounting. I have a quilt that I wrapped to the back of stretcher bars and it has been bugging me that it is open in the back. I now have my solution! Thanks. The gluing to the canvas rather than stitching is also brilliant. Sometimes we just have to forget it's a quilt...

Debbie Babin said...

More good stuff! I like small pieces mounted and raised from the wall. These look very professional.
One of my side lines is professional picture framing. You did very well by putting the brown paper on the back and how you trimmed it. This is exactly how it is done.
However, I cannot bring myself to glue my work to anything! My expertise is in archival preservation....glue, especially elmers makes me cringe! I prefer to hand stitch the art work right through the canvas. Thus, it is not damaged, can be removed and is attached just as well. I also paint canvas and then stretch it. I like to show the canvas as well.
There is always more ways than one.
Again, we have to chose what works for each of us.
Debbie Babin

Deb said...

I've done a few of these lately and I'm relieved to find that the way I decided to do it has been done (sucessfully) before...as if I would check before plunging in ...Yours look great.